Count of Monte Cristo Check-In

I apologize for my absence here the past couple of weeks. We’ve all been sick at my house, the boys with the flu and I with a cold that turned into a sinus infection that has knocked me on my bottom. I’m just now starting to come out of it. Things have also been nutty at work and I’m in the midst of trying to hire a senior assistant. I haven’t had energy to write and not a lot of time to blog hop, but I have been reading! It’s time for another installment of my Count of Monte Cristo reader’s journal (covering pages 417-605.)

9780307271129Here’s what I want to say most about this book right now: Don’t be afraid of big books. For so long I put off reading this classic because its size intimidated me. I was afraid the style would be off-putting or too archaic. How wrong I was! Yes, there are sections that drag a little bit more than others, but on the whole, it’s a remarkably fresh, exciting, well-crafted story. Breaking it up and taking it slow has enabled me to enjoy this classic at my own pace while still reading other books.

Here are some plot highlights of this section (Chapters 34-45:)

  • Two young French men, Baron Franz d’Epinay and Viscount Albert de Morcerf, become acquainted with the Count in Rome. In fact, Dantès orchestrates a “kidnapping” of Albert just do he can save him. Why is Albert so special to Dantès? He’s related to someone from Dantès’ past.
  • The Count is powerful and wealthy enough to save an old associate from being executed, but he’s weird enough to make Franz and Albert watch the other criminal get executed.
  • Franz realizes he’s met the Count before, only when he partied with him in the grotto on Monte Cristo he knew his as “Sinbad.”
  • Dantès and Albert make a plan to meet in Paris at Albert’s house in exactly 3 months.
  • Who should Dantès meet at Albert’s house? Mercédès, his former fiancee, who is Albert’s MOTHER. Dear old dad is none other than Fernand. Mercédès is shaken and unnerved by The Count’s appearance, but she doesn’t say anything about her true feelings to her son.
  • Dantès buys a house in Paris and discovers that Villefort once had an illegitimate child with Madame Danglar there, and tried to kill it. Dantès’ servant, Bertuccio, rescued the child and gave him to his sister-in-law to raise.

Whew! This book certainly doesn’t lack for plot! And all the connections of the characters sometimes make me have to consult Wikipedia so I’m sure I know what’s going on. But it’s still good fun.

So I’ve got a lot of catching up to do, both here and on reading your blogs, friends. I hope you’re all staying well this winter – flu and other illnesses have been running rampant down here. My son’s school was closed because of illness for two days ahead of the holiday weekend. Drink lots of fluids, get some sleep, and wash your hands! 🙂

 

 

 

 

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23 thoughts on “Count of Monte Cristo Check-In

  1. I do hope everyone is feeling better. Being sick is no fun but everyone sick at the same time 😕

    I skimmed your notes on Monte since I’m planning to read it in a few months. I have this edition and it’s beautiful (although I was convinced I’d get another one, that’s a different story).

    I love big chunky classics and I’m all for not being afraid of them. I remember chatting about that topic early on my blog. The experience and the journey is completely worth it!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you! We are all better than we were this time last week. Hopefully by this weekend I’ll be feeling 100% again.

      This has been such a fun experience already, diving into this chunky book.
      Makes me more eager to get into some of the other big books on my Classics Club list.

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      1. Ha ha ha… all three of us had a flu shot last fall too, sorry to say! Apparently this year’s strain is not the one covered by the shot… but it does make it less severe if you do get the flu, so they say.

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  2. Oh no! I hope you and your family fully recover soon. It’s awful when EVERYONE is sick! Better days are coming – hang in there!

    You’re doing awesome with this book! I know you’ve been wanting to read it forever, so good job getting it done! And thanks for the encouragement to read big books — even when they’re scary to think about tackling!

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  3. Hahah Love your response: do not be afraid of big books! 🙂

    It’s an old-fashioned remedy, and I know not everybody is interested in herb/food-based treatments, but we used oil of oregano with the girls for years (and still use it ourselves). Tastes terribly strong, but a few drops in water under the tongue when you’re susceptible (i.e. before you’ve caught something completely but you think you might catch something or are around other people who are poorly) and no worries. It’s very hard with kids in the school system – so. many. bugs. Good luck!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Yessssss, I’m so excited that you’re enjoying Count of Monte Cristo. It gives me hope for myself to finally read it all the way through and love it as much as I want and expect to.

    I hope you feel better! I know this comment is slightly belated so hopefully by now you are healed!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I’m a little slow, but I am sorry to hear everyone at your house got sick. I hope you are all in fine health by this point. So glad you continue to enjoy the Count. How many total pages are there? I know it is chunky but judging by your page numbers at the start of your post, you must be getting close to the end?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ha ha! I’m just now at 54% according to Goodreads. It’s over 1400 pages! My pace has slowed down but I’m still going. It’s a monster! I feel good for tackling it though. And thanks… we are all a lot better than we were a few weeks ago!

      Liked by 1 person

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