Library Checkout June 2019

library-checkout-feature-imageI’m still trying to manage my library holds so that I can also read some of my own books… so far I’ve been doing a good job of not letting them all come in at once. Is it an art, or a science… I’m not sure! My pre-ordered copy of the new Kate Atkinson, Big Sky, arrived at home Tuesday, so the library books will have a wait a few days. Here’s what I got up to at the library this month. Thanks to Bookish Beck for hosting this monthly celebration of library use!

READ:41PwH2e9fjL._SX334_BO1,204,203,200_

The Stranger Diaries by Elly Griffiths

⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐

My Cousin Rachel by Daphne du Maurier

⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐

The Terrible Two by Mac Barnett and Jory John ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐

The Huntress by Kate Quinn ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ (Such a page-turner!)

CURRENTLY READING:

Nothing. I’m reading two of my own books!

CHECKED OUT, TO BE READ:91LDnCtTjEL

City of Girls by Elizabeth Gilbert

Queenie by Candace Carty-Williams

RETURNED UNFINISHED:

I Miss You When You Blink by Mary Laura Philpott (underwhelming)

IN THE HOLDS QUEUE:

Soooooo many books. Here are a few:91Q73aHp3PL

Normal People by Sally Rooney

Evvie Drake Stars Over by Linda Holmes

The Stationery Shop by Marjan Kamali

Maid by Stephanie Land

Let’s hope I can keep an eye on those holds and still chip away at the books from my own shelves. Anything catch your eye from my list?

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It’s Monday! What Are You Reading?

Another week, you guys. This summer is flying by. FYI, it’s a full moon today. I haven’t participated in It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? in a long time, but it feels like the perfect way to begin the week. Thanks to Kathryn at The Book Date for hosting the meme.

Recently Finished:

18869970Last night I finished Daphne Du Maurier’s My Cousin Rachel. I LOVED it. I think I might even like it more than her novel Rebecca. It’s a masterful portrait of obsessive love and suspicion. It’s a Classic Club pick, so hopefully I’ll write more about it soon.

Currently Reading:

The Terrible Two by Mac Barnett and Jory John. This is a book that I started reading aloud to my son, and then he512pU9y4B+L._SX373_BO1,204,203,200_ went and finished it on his own, so now I have to find out what happens! It’s really funny and I think it has great appeal for adults as well as children. It’s about a new kid in town who wants to be his new school’s top prankster, an identity he cultivated at his old school. Little does he know that he’s about to meet a stealthy prankster from whom he can learn a thing or two.

What’s Next:

I Miss You When I Blink: Essays by Mary Laura Philpott. Comparisons to Erma Bombeck, Nora Ephron, and Laurie Colwin all sound appealing. From the Goodreads blurb:

417tPo7IpzL._SX324_BO1,204,203,200_She offers up her own stories to show that identity crises don’t happen just once or only at midlife; reassures us that small, recurring personal re-inventions are both normal and necessary; and advises that if you’re going to faint, you should get low to the ground first. Most of all, Philpott shows that when you stop feeling satisfied with your life, you don’t have to burn it all down and set off on a transcontinental hike (unless you want to, of course). 

Bookish Conversation: My son and I visited a local independent bookstore weekend before last in search of Father’s Day gifts. I was proud of myself for not buying anything for me! My son said that I didn’t need to buy anything for myself because I already had so many books at home “that fill up our entire bookshelf.” I counted my unread books and told him that I only had 57 unread books in the house. He said, incredulously, “57?! You don’t need to buy any more books until you read at least 5 books you already have!” So that’s my plan, folks. Gotta read five of my own books before I can purchase any more. (Note: this does NOT include anything pre-ordered, i.e., the new Kate Atkinson!)

Have a great week!

 

 

Library Checkout April 2019

In an earlier post I lamented never getting to backlist books because of all the holds coming in from the library on new titles. I did pause my holds but that doesn’t mean I’m not checking books out from the library! Here’s what I read, checked out, and have on hold for the month of April. Thanks to Rebecca at Bookish Beck for hosting this monthly meme – check her blog out!

library-checkout-feature-imageLIBRARY BOOKS READ:

Outer Order, Inner Calm – Gretchen Rubin ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐

My Sister the Serial Killer – Oyinkan Braithwaite ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐

Tooth and Nail – Ian Rankin ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐

Karamo: My Story of Embracing Purpose, Healing, and Hope – Karamo Brown ⭐ ⭐ ⭐

CURRENTLY READING:

Harriet the Spy – Louise Fitzhugh (a re-read; I haven’t read it since childhood and was inspired by Marcie at Buried in Print.)

Road Rage – Ruth Rendell (Inspector Wexford #17)

Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Start-up – John Carreyrou (digital audio book; about 75% finished)

CHECKED OUT, TO BE READ:

The Folded Clock – Heidi Julavits (memoir)

The Rumor – Elin Hilderbrand (“light” fiction)

The Sky at Our Feet – Nadia Hashimi (middle grade)

The Story of Diva and Flea – Mo Willems (chapter book – not for my son, for me!)

The Psychopath Test – Jon Ronson (nonfiction)

A Dying Fall – Elly Griffiths (mystery)

Wade in the Water – Tracy K. Smith (poetry)

Bright Dead Things – Ada Limon (poetry)

IN THE HOLDS QUEUE:

We do NOT have time to list all of my holds. Currently I have 18 books on hold (for me) and some movies and music too. It’s utter insanity. I’m trying to manage them and not have them all come in at once. I still want to read some of my OWN books, plus I’ve got two classics in line for May reading. Some of the books I have on hold are:

Maid: Hard Work, Low Pay, and a Mother’s Will to Survive – Stephanie Land

The Care and Feeding of Ravenously Hungry Girls – Anissa Gray

An Anonymous Girl – Greer Hendricks and Sarah Pekkanen

RETURNED UNREAD:

I really should be better about keeping track of this! I’m sure I’ve returned things unread but I didn’t write that down. 🙂

So, anything spark your interest here? Have you read any of these? What’s your latest item checked out from your library?

Classics Club Spin # 20!

It’s time again for another Classics Club Spin. I am so grateful for these Spins or else I really would take ten years to complete my list instead of five. Here are the rules:

At your blog, before next Monday 22nd April 2019, create a post that lists twenty books of your choice that remain “to be read” on your Classics Club list.

This is your Spin List.

On Monday 22nd April, we’ll post a number from 1 through 20. The challenge is to read whatever book falls under that number on your Spin List by 31st May, 2019.

This is perfect timing for me because I will be DONE WITH THE COUNT OF MONTE CRISTO soon! (Maybe even tonight.) Woo-hoo!

Here is my Spin List (in alphabetical order by author:)

  1. Fahrenheit 451 – Bradbury
  2. The Tenant of Wildfell Hall – Bronte
  3. The Master and Margarita – Bulgakov
  4. The Woman in White – Collins
  5. A Study in Scarlet – Conan Doyle
  6. Great Expectations – Dickens
  7. Love Medicine – Erdrich
  8. Howard’s End – Forster
  9. Cold Comfort Farm – Gibbons
  10. Nightingale Wood – Gibbons
  11. The Thin Man – Hammett
  12. Jonah’s Gourd Vine -Hurston
  13. Quicksand – Larsen
  14. The Blue Castle – Montgomery
  15. The Gowk Storm – Morrison
  16. Quartet in Autumn – Pym
  17. Ceremony – Silko
  18. The Warden – Trollope
  19. Brideshead Revisited – Waugh
  20. Stoner – Williams

We’ll see what number they draw on Monday.

Have you read any of these?

Top Ten Tuesday: Books on my Spring TBR

By now y’all know that I am a major mood reader and don’t make ironclad TBR lists for months or even for seasons. But I do love looking at a good TBR list, so I decided to post on the topic for today’s Top Ten Tuesday (hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl). It’s been a while since I’ve done one of these. Here are some books I might get to this Spring:

Currently Checked Out from the Library:

 

Currently In the Holds Queue and Nearing Being Number 1:

 

Three Books I Own That I Might Get To this Spring:

Have you read any of these? What’s on your Spring TBR?

BRL Best Books of 2018

Some of you may remember that I keep a paper book journal in addition to my Goodreads account for book tracking. When I read a book that particularly moves me I give it a star in my paper journal, which equals a five-star rating on Goodreads. As I looked over my 2018 reading I realized that TWENTY books had rated a star this year! So I had some choices to make as it came time to make my Top Ten List for the year. Without further ado, here are my favorite books of 2018. (Note: I’m a huge backlist reader so not all of these books were published this year.)

In no particular order:

  • The Book of Joy: Lasting Happiness in a Changing World by Dalai Lama XIV, Desmond Tutu, Douglas Carlton Abrams (2016). This was a life-affirming, uplifting audio book that truly inspired me. I learned a lot about the friendship between the Dalai Lama and Bishop Tutu, and how each man approaches life’s challenges with grace and equanimity.
  • How Many Miles to Babylon? by Jennifer Johnston (1974.) Set in Ireland in WWI, this beautifully written novella explores the growing friendship between a young member of the landed gentry and one of the workers on his family’s estate as they both set off to fight in the war. Truly moving with a devastating ending.
  • An American Marriage by Tayari Jones (2018.) Just a gorgeous, emotionally probing book about two people who fell in love with the best of intentions – and then life throws them a horrific curveball that reverberates for years. It’s a beautifully told relationship story with well-drawn, believable characters. Unforgettable.
  • Kitchens of the Great Midwest by J. Ryan Stradal (2015.) What a surprise! A book that had been on my TBR list for a few years and I’m so glad I decided to read it. It was one of those absorbing reads that made me want to ignore my family for a few days. Linked short stories, all centering in some way around the character of Eva, a young woman in Minnesota with a passion and a gift for cooking. Foodies will love it, but anyone who just wants a good story will enjoy it too.
  • Born A Crime: Stories From a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah (2016.) The BEST AUDIO BOOK I’VE EVER LISTENED TO. Funny, surprising, illuminating, moving. I learned so much about South African history through this story of Noah’s unlikely existence. I can’t say enough good things about it. It’s one I would read (or listen to) again for sure.
  • Giovanni’s Room by James Baldwin (1956.) This novel is exquisitely written and emotionally tough. A portrait of a man utterly in denial about who he truly is. David, a young, rootless, white American living in Paris in the 1950’s, has a fiancee he’s running away from when he meets a handsome Italian waiter and falls in love. His denial sets off a tragic chain of events for everyone involved. Baldwin is a genius! I intend to read everything he’s written.
  • The Library Book by Susan Orlean (2018.) I recently wrote about this one, but it’s just a gem of a nonfiction book, about the importance of libraries today and Orlean’s emotional connection to them through her late mother, as well as a gripping true-crime account of the devastating library fire in L.A.’s Central Library in 1986. Lots going on here, but Orlean weaves all the strands together beautifully.
  • Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman (2017.) That rare super-hyped novel that is worthy of all the praise. What starts off as a quirky portrait of a lonely young woman who doesn’t connect well with other human beings becomes a moving and warm-hearted novel about unexpected connections and the capacity for change and growth. A lovely book that I will definitely read again someday.
  • Brother by David Chariandy (2018, first published in Canada and the UK 2017.) Not one word wasted in this slim but powerful novel about two brothers growing up in a poor, multi-cultural part of Toronto in the 1980’s. There is tragedy here but there is also terrific beauty and great love, especially in the character of the boys’ Trinidadian immigrant mother, who works herself to the bone to provide for her sons and tried to give them a better life. I just adored this.
  • The Sun Does Shine: How I Found Life and Freedom on Death Row by Anthony Ray Hinton (2018.) Another book I recently read and can’t stop talking about – thank you Oprah! Hinton’s ridiculous sham of a trial for crimes he didn’t commit will make you angry, and his emotional journey living on death row in Alabama for 30 years will move you, inspire you, and make you question your beliefs about the death penalty.

51mPEE0qUtL._SX336_BO1,204,203,200_Honorable Mention: Anything is Possible by Elizabeth Strout (2017.)  Linked short stories, a companion piece to Strout’s My Name is Lucy Barton. Spare prose and heartbreaking, real characters in small town middle America. Strout is a hell of a writer.

 It’s been such a good reading year. Have you read any of the books on my list? Do any of these pique your interest?

Library Checkout, November 2018

library-checkout-feature-image

Library Checkout is a monthly library-use meme hosted by Rebecca at Bookish Beck. Please do visit her blog, she always reads so diversely (and in massive quantities, too!) Here is a snapshot of my library usage in November:

LIBRARY BOOKS READ:

There There – Tommy Orange ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐

The Death of Mrs. Westaway – Ruth Ware ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐

The House at Sea’s End – Elly Griffiths (Ruth Galloway mystery #3)                 ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ I am LOVING this series!

Dark Sacred Night – Michael Connelly (Harry Bosch mystery #31/Renée Ballard #2) ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ I don’t know how Connelly does it. He’s a MASTER of compelling, propulsive writing. I still care about Bosch 31 books later. I’m excited to see the new direction he’s taking now that he’s partnering with Ballard.9780062368607_p0_v3_s550x406

I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life – Ed Yong ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐

Unsheltered – Barbara Kingsolver ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ (Review to come)

When Things Fall Apart: Heart Advice For Difficult Times – Pema Chödrön ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐

CURRENTLY READING:

51LSDwIJIUL._SX327_BO1,204,203,200_The Sun Does Shine: How I Found Life and Freedom on Death Row – Anthony Ray Hinton

A Room Full of Bones (Ruth Galloway #4) – Elly Griffiths

CHECKED OUT, TO BE READ:

Dare to Lead – Brené Brown

Spy School – Stuart Gibbs (middle-grade fiction – I’ve been meaning to get back into reading MG fiction for a while now)

IN THE HOLDS QUEUE:

The Library Book – Susan Orlean

Becoming – Michelle Obama

Fox 8  – George Saunders

Gmorning, Gnight!:Little Pep Talks For Me and You – Lin-Manuel Miranda40854717

Go Tell it On the Mountain – James Baldwin (My Classics Club spin book!)

Plus, 6 more books on hold that I’ve had on hold for a while now and keep pushing back using my library system’s “suspend” function. I’m starting to wonder if I really want to read these after all! It might be time to let some of these go.

Anything from my selections look interesting to you? What have you checked out from your local library lately?