Mid-Year Reading Stats (and Book #9 of 20 Books of Summer)

We are well into July so it’s time for a mid-year look at my reading stats and progress on reading goals for the year. Reading is generally is going pretty well for me right now, although the deep concentration I enjoyed during my furlough period, when I was a reading machine, is much lessened by time constraints. I have to dip in and out of books in small doses, which is what I mostly did pre-pandemic, but somehow the quality of my attention is more fragmented. I guess considering everything that’s going on, I’m doing fairly well. 

Books read: 66

Fiction: 52

Nonfiction: 14

Adult/YA: 45

Middle Grade (mostly read with my son:) 21

Male Authors: 23

Female Authors: 43

Authors of Color: 16 (24%)

Genres: Classics (10) Literary Fiction (9) Mystery (8) Memoir/Biography (7) General Nonfiction/Essay/Self-Help (7) Romance (3) Short Stories (1)

Favorites So Far:

Favorites Read With My Son:

READING GOALS:

1. Read 20 Nonfiction Titles. On track!

2. Reread Four Books I Own. On track! Just one more to go.

3. Read 12 Titles From Classics Club List. On track! I’ve read 7 so far. I have 27 more to go in total before the deadline of February 2023.

4. Read More Authors of Color. On track! Last year’s paltry 18% gave me a low bar to clear. I’m hoping to hit at least 30% for this year.

In other news, my ninth book of the 20 Books of Summer challenge is Agatha Christie’s The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (1926.) I had high expectations for this one, but something prevented me from connecting to the story fully. I can’t quite pin down what was amiss. It could just be reader’s frame of mind here, because so many people count this one as a favorite. Hercules Poirot is our detective, and he’s as charming and astute as ever. Maybe I missed his frequent sidekick, Captain Hastings. I didn’t warm to the narrator of the tale, Dr. Sheppard. He was devoid of personality so perhaps that’s what kept me at a remove.

51DcQZO7VMLOne of the wealthiest and most well-liked people in the small village of King’s Abbot, Roger Ackroyd, is found murdered in his study. Of course there are many suspects who’ve been in or near the estate at the time of the murder. Ackroyd’s niece, Flora, engages Hercule Poirot to assist the police and clear the name of her fiancé, Ralph Paton. Poirot is in town attempting to relax in retirement (which struck me as funny since this is only the 4th book in a series that would stretch to more than 40 titles.) He even says at one point, “In all probability this is the last case I shall ever investigate.”

I did enjoy the number of suspects, and there are lots of subplots and intrigues to follow and try to work out. As usual I didn’t guess the murderer until very late in the game. I can see why this was a seminal work of mystery, in that the innovative twist is clever and controversial. While I did enjoy it overall, I can’t say it’s one of my favorites. ⭐ ⭐ ⭐

So how are you doing with your own 2020 reading goals? Let me know below.

 

 

 

My 20 Books of Summer List

I love that Cathy keeps the rules for her annual challenge on the loose side; it fits my Mood Reader personality. And as an mentioned in my last post, I’m back to work, so my reading time is definitely cut short. In fact, since the last time I posted, I’ve read only 100 pages of Barbara Pym’s Excellent Women – all week! My brain feels like oatmeal with all the new procedures and spatial configurations that our library is enacting in the name of safety. On my work breaks, when I would normally read, I’m watching episodes of Bosch on my phone.

But I’m gonna trust that eventually I will get back on track, so I’m putting out my 20 Books of Summer list. I have fifteen hard copies on hand right now, and I’m gonna leave my last five books open, so I can choose some at whim. (I do have a list of options made, of course!) I’m fairly certain one of my extra five will be Michael Connelly’s latest book, Fair Warning, which is not a Bosch book but is about reporter Jack McEvoy instead.

Here we go.

  1. The Secret Adversary – Agatha Christie
  2. Poirot Investigate – Agatha Christie
  3. Weather -Jenny Offill
  4. Quartet in Autumn-Barbara Pym
  5. The Right Swipe – Alisha Rai
  6. A Murder is Announced – Agatha Christie
  7. The Blue Castle – L.M. Montgomery
  8. The Reckoning – Jane Casey
  9. Swimming Lessons – Claire Fuller
  10. How to Be An Antiracist – Ibram X. Kendi
  11. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd – Agatha Christie
  12. The Chalk Pit – Elly Griffiths
  13. New Waves – Kevin Nguyen
  14. The Blackhouse – Peter May
  15. A Dark and Twisted Tide – Sharon Bolton
  16. TBD
  17. TBD
  18. TBD
  19. TBD
  20. TBD

I have some romances on my TBR but just don’t have physical copies of them so I will probably choose many of those to round out the list. I’d like to read The Bromance Book Club, A Hope Divided, The Unhoneymooners, and Get A Life, Chloe Brown.

Since the aim of this challenge is to clear a bunch of books from your TBR, then I will win no matter how many of these I actually finish. Good luck with your list if you’re participating, and let me know if you’ve read any of the books I’ve listed. Have a good weekend and Happy Reading!

The Summer of Romance and Mystery

The only constant in life is change, right? My library system will be reopening to the public next Friday. At least half the branches and the main library, anyway. I’m still a bit in shock and not really happy with the pace of it, but I’m not in charge (even our director is not in charge; it’s the county mayor’s decision.) But as I must work, I will be there. The virus in our part of the country is not as sweeping as in other places, but it’s still around. So I will wear a mask, sit behind plexiglass desk shields, point to the six feet markers on the floor, wash my hands a million times, and do the best I can. To begin we won’t have any public computer use, and that’s a good thing (less people sitting in the building for a length of time.) No programs or story times indefinitely. I’m nervous, and know that with our nearest branch being closed, we will be doubly busy. But I will be be very glad to see my coworkers and my lovely library regulars.

As to how this will affect my reading, it’s hard to say. I imagine I will be tired and possibly frazzled, so I don’t plan on any heavy reading for a while. I’m calling this summer THE SUMMER OF ROMANCE AND MYSTERY! I had planned to participate in Cathy’s 20 Books of Summer event, and I am still going to give it a go – with the lightest, fluffiest books I can find. My “light and fluffy” still includes lots of murder mysteries, by the way. I’m thinking of knocking out a lot of Agatha Christie this summer, as I have an unofficial goal to eventually read all of her novels. I will post my list for 20 Books of Summer next weekend.

img_5695So for a bit I won’t be around WordPress as much as I have been this spring. I hope to post once a week, on weekends, and catch up on your blogs as much as I can in between. Please send some good thoughts my way and to all library workers as they begin to reopen libraries. I knew I’d eventually go back, but the furlough wasn’t supposed to end for another month, so it’s an adjustment. I hope you are all safe and well, and fully stocked with engaging books. I’m currently rereading one of my all-time favorite books: Excellent Women by Barbara Pym. A delicious and smart comfort read if there ever was one. Till next time, read on, friends!

Friday TBR Talk

Another beautiful day here, and I’m outside in the backyard. Another Friday. Friday is vacuum day for me. To give my days some sense of structure I’ve made a little chore chart for myself (or whoever wants to help) with one or two chores for each day. Since I’m not working it has helped me retain a sense of time and purpose, and gives me one solid productive thing to do each day. And it helps me differentiate between the days so they don’t all run together! You gotta do what you gotta do.

Earlier this week, my son said, “I wish I had some new books to read.” Well that was a request that I couldn’t pass up! I immediately ordered some books from Barnes and Noble (I want them to survive the pandemic too) and here they are (minus a Big Nate book he immediately grabbed from the box):

I’ve read The Mysterious Benedict Society (awesome) and my son has read the Mac B Kid Spy (he loved it, so I thought he’d like to have his own copy) but Flora, George, and Wild Robot are all new to both of us. Have you read any of these?

Earlier today I was listening to the Reading Glasses podcast, one of my favorites, and they were talking about TBR piles and/or lists (episode 148). Mallory was saying that she feels like TBR piles and lists make people feel stress about their reading, and she advocates getting rid of them and just having some unread books in the house, interspersed with books you’ve already read. She likened her unread books to snacks, that she has the pleasure of “getting to” enjoy rather than feeling like she “has to” get to them or check off some list. Brea was saying that it makes her feel anxious to think about getting rid of her TBR list, and that she doesn’t want to forget about books since she considers herself kind of a spacey person. She advocates culling your TBR list periodically, though, if the length starts to stress you out.

I do have a rather lengthy TBR list on Goodreads, and I side with Brea in this issue. I like having one place I can go to see what might fit the mood next. In pre-pandemic times I would check my list and order things from other library branches, so that I’d have three to four books at home to choose from when the mood struck. Now I take comfort that at least I have a place to check for inspiration in case any of the 40+ unread physical books in my house don’t appeal.

Inspired by their episode, I went through my list today and I culled 26 books! It feels good. Like the equivalent of cleaning out a drawer and giving a bag of stuff to the thrift store. Sometimes I can’t even remember why I put a book on my list, or I look at it and go, “Meh.” Meh is definitely a reason to remove a book from the list,

How do you all feel about TBR lists or piles? Do you ever sometimes wish you didn’t have one? Do you periodically go through them? Do they cause you stress? Do you enjoy the Reading Glasses podcast? Let me know in the comments.

The Most Exciting Bit

Yesterday I finished reading Mary Anne by Daphne du Maurier (review will post during DDM Reading Week.) And then came what I think is my favorite part of reading: the sweet spot between books!

Once I’ve finished a book I write it down in my book journal, with any impressions or categorization that I want to include. Then I head straightaway to Goodreads, where I make sure I’ve got a star rating and the “shelves” I want. Next I go to the Listopia section of Goodreads, which in my opinion is best accessed through a desktop or iPad browser, and NOT the app. There’s a list that I add my books to called 2020: What Women Born in the 1970s Have Read So Far This Year. The list creator has been doing one for years now and I look forward to the new one each year. I add the book to the list and see if anyone else has read it this year as well. (You can rank your choices however you like.) It’s always fun to see what are the most popular books in any given year, and the sheer variety of books read is amazing. 6,691 books were listed last year.

The first 8 books on the list

 

So then I get to decide what book to read next. For me this is THE most exciting time. With a TBR list currently at 367 books, I have so many possibilities. Currently, with the quarantine and the libraries closed, I am trying to read what I’ve got on hand. I’m well stocked with my own unread books and still have 5 or 6 books from the library I’ve not yet gotten to. I know some of you plan out your reading weeks in advance, or get ARCs that you want to write about close to publication time. I don’t do either of those things, so I really just see what I’m in the mood for.

The last 6 books on the list, currently.

 

Last night I decided I was in the mood for a mystery, and I have three from the library. I chose Elly Griffith’s The Woman in Blue, which is the 8th in her Ruth Galloway series. And yes, I still need to read Adam Bede, my Classics Club pick, but frankly I’m putting it off. I started it and the dialect is very challenging so far. And it’s over 600 pages! I swear when I initially put it on my list I thought it was much shorter! 😂 Oh well, I’ll come back around to it after the Griffith.

So what do you think? Are you a big nerd like me? Do you relish the feeling of having completed a book and not knowing what you’ll read next? I’m curious about those of you who schedule your reading. Maybe you get a similar feeling at the beginning of the month when you make your monthly plan? Mood readers and planners alike, let me know in the comments.

Reading Roundup 4/25/20

It’s a gray day here today, but mostly we’ve been really lucky in Tennessee this Spring, with seasonable temperatures and sunny or partly sunny days. I’ve spent more time in my backyard this spring than I’ve ever done. I’ve loved watching nature, the birds and bunnies be born and get bigger before our eyes. I am so grateful for the good weather and the lack of mosquitoes! I know soon enough they will come out to torment me and I will be forced inside more often. 😢

img_5624So the Classics Club picked the number 6 last week; therefore my choice is Adam Bede by George Eliot. I got the ebook and the audiobook both from the library. I started it and left it behind temporarily in favor of Daphne Du Maurier’s Mary Anne, which is my pick for Ali’s Daphne Du Maurier reading week celebration, May 11 through 17. (I have until the end of May to get Adam Bede read. It’s much bigger than I had thought and quite intimidating.) Mary Anne is a historical fiction novel set in the late 1700s, based on Du Maurier’s great-great- grandmother, and so far it’s very good. I’m about 1/3 of the way through.

Recently Finished:

img_5623Such a Fun Age by Kiley Reid

I loved this! I inhaled it. For the last 1/3 of the book I sat at my kitchen table and ignored anyone who tried to talk to me. I feel like this is a very American novel, perfectly encapsulating our obsession with image, our addiction to social media, our inability to talk about or deal with class and race. We get alternate perspectives of a young black woman, Emira, and a thirtysomething white woman, Alix, in 2016 Philadelphia. Emira is the babysitter to Alix’s two children, something she is really good at and enjoys. But she constantly compares herself to her friends and wonders if she is not “grown-up” enough. Her impending 26th birthday has something to do with that – she’ll be kicked off her parents’s health insurance. Meanwhile, Alix is feeling lost as well, having had two children in quick succession while trying to start a business that has garnered her a large Instagram following and a book deal. (I confess to never really understanding exactly what her business was about… something with writing letters?) Alix is not very sympathetic, despite the reader knowing some hard times she went through in high school. She never really got OVER things that happened in high school and she just seemed desperately insecure and lonely to me throughout the novel, so I supposed I pitied her rather than sympathized. Also I was angry at her poor treatment of one of her children, and the way she refused to accept responsibility for certain things in her past. Emira was imminently more likeable and having been broke and lost in my twenties I could certainly identify with her in that way. I also loved how much she cared about the children in her care. Anyway, crazy things happen, there are a couple of big twists, and I’m not going to spoil it further. If you’re looking for a smart, fun, slightly maddening exploration of class and race and motherhood, look no further. It’s a page-turner. This would make a GREAT book group pick.

The Cutting Season by Attica Locke

Talk about an atmospheric mystery! Set in Louisiana, between Baton Rouge and New Orleans, this contemporary mystery is a slow burn but very good. Caren Gray manages an antebellum plantation that hosts events, like weddings, and tours from school groups. A single mother, she lives on the grounds with her school-aged daughter, Morgan. Caren grew up around the plantation since her mother worked for the family that owned it. Now the body of a young migrant woman who worked in the sugarcane fields next door has turned up in a shallow grave on the edge of the grounds, and Caren is drawn into the mystery of why she was killed and who killed her. There are lots of red herrings, spooky scenes on the grounds, a snooping but handsome local reporter, shady business deals, and Caren’s complicated relationship with her ex-partner that all come together to make this a satisfying mystery. It deftly touches on issues of immigration, the criminal justice system, and the aftermath of slavery. I also enjoyed Locke’s previous mystery, Black Water Rising. I plan to check out her newer books as well.

Personal Stuff:

I’ve walked every day this past week, woohoo! I’m still enjoying all the blooms in the neighborhood very much. Today’s picture is from my own front yard, some pink dianthus that I planted years ago. My garden is coming along nicely, although I was very mad at some squirrel who dug up the dirt in my cucumber patch area and displaced a seedling that had sprouted up apparently from an old seed of last year’s garden. I think it was a cucumber seedling but I’m not sure. Anyway, that darn squirrel dug it up just for fun, I guess. 😕 Peas, arugula, and kohlrabi are sprouting. I’ve never had kohlrabi but I thought I’d try it since it came free with my seed order! I planted a bunch of flower seeds too, like zinnias, sunflowers, bee balm, and echinacea. I can already see the zinnia seeds sprouting.

I’ll have some extra time to garden this summer because I was among 169 library employees temporarily furloughed this week. That’s virtually the entire library system. So we won’t be opening up the system anytime soon! I have made my peace with it, mostly, because what else can I do? They say that they hope to call people back to work soon, that the furlough is slated for eight weeks starting May 9, but they can call us back at any time before the eight weeks is up. It’s a county budget thing, since tax revenue for March and April will be so down. Employees in other departments were furloughed but the library took the biggest hit. Initially it made me very sad because it made me feel like libraries were not important. And by extension, like I was not important. But now I am thinking that libraries are always among the first things to be cut in budgetary hard times, as unfair and shortsighted as that is. I’m certainly not alone in America or indeed the world. Many people are losing or have already lost employment. It’s just the first time it’s happened to me, and it marred my sense of self. I take great pride in the work I do and I love the work that I do. I love my community. I think about my patrons all the time. I hope they don’t forget about us. In my darker moments I think, well, now everyone will have to turn to ebooks and they won’t come into the libraries anymore once we can open up again. But I know that’s not true. I’ll be fine. The libraries will open again. I keep telling myself, This Too Shall Pass. Anyway, now I get to do the interesting psychological and philosophical questioning of personal worth outside of work – who am I without my job and what am I worth when I’m not working? It’s almost exciting to face these big questions. Being an optimistic person, I try to find silver linings anywhere I can. There are quite a few here.

If you are also facing a job loss, temporary or permanent, my heart goes out to you. We are all dealing with stressful things now, and I hope that we are all being extra compassionate with ourselves and not beating ourselves up too much for not being “productive,” or eating too many snacks, or watching too much TV or whatever. I am taking a note from my blogger friend Fiction Fan and treating myself to extra medicinal chocolate these days! Perhaps reading books is the way you are treating yourself kindly. I hope your stacks, be they virtual or paper, are providing you with comfort and joy.

Cold Comfort Farm by Stella Gibbons (Classics Club)

Another month, another book read for my Classics Club list. And this one was terrific! Quirky, funny, engaging – a book to sink into and escape the world a little bit. Stella Gibbons’s 1932 novel Cold Comfort Farm is a real treat! I have not seen the film but I hear it is also good and I will try to find it somewhere.

60832888518__2b174e12-0149-4461-b2ab-5083d7eae854Flora Poste’s parents died of the “annual epidemic of the influenza or Spanish plague which occurred in her twentieth year” (yikes!) and they have only left her a hundred pounds a year. She decamps to a friend’s house, a Mrs. Smiling, a wealthy young widow, to figure out what to do next. Mrs. Smiling suggest that she get a job and eventually get a flat of her own. Flora is having none of that. Her plan is to write to one of her long lost relatives and get them to host her indefinitely.

“I think it’s degrading of you, Flora,” cried Mrs. Smiling at breakfast. “Do you truly mean that you won’t ever want to work at anything?” Her friend replied after some thought.

“Well, when I am fifty-three or so I would like to write a novel as good as Persuasion, but with a modern setting, of course. For the next thirty years or so I shall be collecting material for it. If anyone asks me what I work at, I shall say, “Collecting material.” No one can object to that. Besides, so I shall be.”

The most appealing reply comes from her cousin, Judith Starkadder. Appealing is a relative term, of course. She offers her a place at Cold Comfort Farm, in Sussex, along with the strange and intriguing lines, “So you are after your rights at last… my man once did your father a great wrong.” Mrs. Smiling says, “it sounds an appalling place, but in a different way from all the others. I mean it does sound interesting and appalling, while the others just sound appalling.”

So Flora decides to go to Cold Comfort Farm and finds a very quirky, rather dirty and unkempt place full of bizarre and somewhat pathological characters. In addition to Judith, who seems strangely and overly attached to her son, Seth, who is menacingly overly sexual and obsessed with the “talkies,” there is fire-and-brimstone preacher Amos, Judith’s husband. Their other son Reuben is convinced that Flora wants to steal the farm from him. She also encounters Adam, the old hired farmhand who is obsessed with the livestock and calls Flora “Robert Poste’s Child.” The place is absolutely bonkers and yet Flora is not intimidated by anything, really, showing a great sense of humor as she goes about her business of righting all the wrongs at CCF. She also has to avoid the zealous attentions of a Mr. Mybug, a writer whom she had met once at a party in London and who is staying in the nearest town of Howling. The pompous Mybug absurdly thinks that Branwell Bronte actually wrote the books that his sisters did.

“There’s a quality in you…” said Mr. Mybug staring at her and waving his fingers. “Remote somehow, and nymph-like… oddly unawakened. I should like to write a novel about you and call it ‘Virginal.'”

“Do, if it passes the time for you,” said Flora.

Flora has plans for setting things in order at Cold Comfort Farm, but her most formidable adversary is Aunt Ada, who only comes down from her attic room once or twice a year and holds the purse strings and controls the family with her imposing will. We find out that Ada had seen “something nasty in the woodshed” when she was little and that it had scarred her for life.

You told them you were mad. You had been mad since you saw something nasty in the woodshed, years and years and years ago. If any of them went away, to any other part of the country, you would go much madder. Any attempt by any of them to get away from the farm made one of your attacks of madness come on. It was unfortunate in some ways but useful in others… The woodshed incident had twisted something in your child-brain, seventy years ago.

Will Flora’s plans for improving the farm and it’s residents’s lives work? Will she find out why she is owed a debt because of her father? Will we ever find out what Ada saw in the woodshed? This was a hilarious, wickedly smart, very entertaining read. I have no knowledge of the rural melodramas of the 1930s that this novel is supposed to be a “merciless parody” of, as the book jacket says. But that didn’t detract from my enjoyment at all. Flora’s plucky determination, as improbable as it might have been, was charming, and I loved seeing her figure out the best ways to work her magic on the sad, lost, hapless residents of the farm. I can see myself reading this again sometime in the future and I highly recommend it to anyone who hasn’t yet read it.

Classics Club Spin #23 List

The good folks at the Classics Club have decided to host a Spin, whereby they will choose a number between 1 and 20. Participants are to make a smaller list from their master list of classics yet to read, numbered 1-20. The number will be announced tomorrow, April 19. As I am doing well with my challenge, sticking to reading one book a month from my list, I thought, Why not participate? I recently finished Stella Gibbon’s Cold Comfort Farm (review to come) and so the Spin pick will be my May classic. Participants have until June 1 to read their book. Here’s my list:

  1. Fahrenheit 451 – Bradbury
  2. The Tenant of Wildfell Hall – Bronte
  3. The Master and Margarita – Bulgakov
  4. A Study in Scarlet -Conan Doyle
  5. Great Expectations – Dickens
  6. Adam Bede- Eliot
  7. Invisible Man – Ellison
  8. Love Medicine – Erdrich
  9. Howard’s End – Forster
  10. Nightingale Wood – Gibbons
  11. The Thin Man – Hammett
  12. Jonah’s Gourd Vine – Hurston
  13. Life Among the Savages – Jackson
  14. The Blue Castle – Montgomery
  15. Beloved – Morrison
  16. Less Than Angels- Pym
  17. Quartet in Autumn – Pym
  18. The Picture of Dorian Gray – Wilde
  19. Stoner – Williams
  20. To the Lighthouse – Woolf

I am hopeful that the spin will result in one that I own a copy of, just to make it easier and cheaper. 🤞 Which ones have you read and enjoyed? Which have you not enjoyed? Do you know if any of these have particularly god audiobook versions?

Reading Roundup 4/10/20

Hey friends. How’s it going? This week has been the one so far where I’ve questioned what day is it the most often. What are days? 😉 I hope you’re safe and staying well. I make a daily To Do list which helps me feel sort of productive, because I can’t seem to let go of the notion that I need to be productive to feel good. My standards of productivity are a little different from normal, though: yoga, meditation, laundry, calling my parents, supervising my son’s optional academic work, little cleaning projects – those are my To Dos.

This week I was able to do some actual work for the library, which felt really good. I submitted two videos for our Facebook page, specifically for children. One was with my son, where he helped me do two fingerplays, and the other was me reading Mo Willems’s The Pigeon Wants a Puppy. I don’t know if they’ll use them but it felt good to use my brain in an official capacity. I miss my job. I miss my library patrons. I don’t know when we’ll get back to work at the library. So many “I don’t knows.”

Oh well. We keep going, don’t we? There are books to be read, after all! Thank God for those. This week I finished two great books, began two more, and acquired one from my local independent bookstore through the mail. I’m going to buy one book from them a month while we are all social distancing. I hope all the indie bookstores make it!

RECENTLY FINISHED:

Persuasion by Jane Austen (owned paperback)

I figured out, using Goodreads and my old book journal, that this was my FOURTH time reading Persuasion. I had no idea! I would have bet money it was three. My book journal says I read it in 2008 and that it was a reread, so I must have read it sometime before I began the book journal, which was 2001. I guess I read it in high school or college then. It’s funny that I can’t remember. A voracious reader’s lot in life, I guess. Anyway, what a perfect choice for this unsettling time. I was struck this time by his funny it was, how ridiculously vain and superficial Anne’s father and sister’s were. How awfully they treat Anne! And still, she is so gracious and patient. A thoroughly entertaining, comforting, romantic read.

The Beautiful Struggle by Ta-Nehisi Coates (library hardback)

This was lovely. A short, lyrical memoir about growing up in West Baltimore in the 1980’s and 1990’s (he was born in 1975) and also about his father, a force of nature, an ex-Black Panther, a learned man who, while sometimes domineering, was desperately trying to shepherd his children successfully through the perils of racism, gangs, and the crack cocaine era to successful adulthood.

All our friends were fatherless, and Dad was some sort of blessing, but he made it hard to feel that way. He was a practicing fascist, mandating books and banning religion. Once he caught Big Bill praying at the kitchen table and ordered him to stop—

“You want to pray, pray to me. I put food on this table.”

Ta-Nehisi was a dreamy child, a pacifist, a fan of fantasy and science fiction, and it sounded like he might have experienced attention deficit disorder from the way he described how he acted in a classroom setting. But everyone knew he was smart, and the expectation of reaching his potential was ever present. He also had to learn how to be tough and fight other kids when necessary, lessons he learned from his revered older brother Big Bill. I really enjoyed reading about the rap music of the 1980s and how it became an avenue of self expression for Coates, his brother, and friends, and I loved reading about how Coates’s dad ran a printing press in his house, finding and reprinting forgotten texts by and about Africans and African American writers. His children may have tried to resist the Consciousness his father was trying to impart but they ultimately absorbed the Knowledge anyway, something many of us can relate to in our own childhoods. This was a very good memoir. I recommend it.

CURRENTLY READING:

Cold Comfort Farm by Stella Gibbons (my April Classics Club pick – owned paperback)

Untamed by Glennon Doyle (memoir/feminism/self-help – library hardback)

RECENTLY ACQUIRED:

img_5571How to Be An Antiracist by Ibrahim X. Kendi (National Book Award-Winning author of Stamped From the Beginning, which I haven’t yet read, but want to.)

What have y’all been reading lately? Have you purchased anything recently? Or do you have a good television show to recommend instead? I’d love to hear from you about what you’ve been doing or reading this week. And Happy Easter to those of you who celebrate.

2020 Reading Goal Check In

Let me start this post by paraphrasing something I saw and loved on Instagram this week. You’re not required to be productive in a FREAKING PANDEMIC. Full stop. Okay, now that that’s out of the way, let’s talk 2020 reading goals. It’s almost the end of March, which means that the year is almost 1/4 through!

My four reading goals for this year are:

  1. Read 20 nonfiction titles
  2. Reread four favorite books.
  3. Read 12 titles from my Classics Club list.
  4. Read more authors of color (higher than last year’s pitiful 18%.)

I’m psyched to say that so far I’m on track with all of my goals. I’ve read eight nonfiction titles, and reread one book (Sylvia Boorstein’s It’s Easier Than You Think.) I’ve read three Classics Club books, and so far my authors of color is at a better 24%.

I’m toying with rereading a Jane Austen novel soon, as they are the ultimate in comfort reading for me. And this lady needs some comfort reading! I haven’t read Persuasion in a long time so that might be the one.

What’s my favorite read so far this year? Ugh, it’s tough. It’s either Your House Will Pay by Steph Cha or Crossing to Safety by Wallace Stegner. Or The Singer’s Gun by Emily St. John Mandel. OR Christy Harrison’s Anti-Diet. Too hard!

One thing I’ve loved so far this year are the great books my son and I have been reading together. So far my favorites are Fudge-a-Mania by Judy Blume and Mac Cracks the Code by Mac Barnett.

I hope you all are staying safe and healthy, able to take walks outside or do yoga or something else to clear your mind, and able to pry yourselves away from the news. It’s hard for me but I’ve been a bit better about not constantly checking news or Twitter. I’ll leave you with something hilarious I found on a friend’s Instagram story. It’s a Choose Your Recluse chart using famous movie characters. I think I’m a cross between Boss Lady and Sloppy Wizard. Which recluse are you?