Thoughts on Anne of the Island by L.M. Montgomery #AnneReadalong2017 (Book 8 of #20BooksofSummer)

Note: Jane at Greenish Bookshelf and Jackie at Death By Tsundoku are co-hosting an Anne of Green Gables series readalong for the remainder of the year.  Check out their blogs for more info on how to join the fun!

“I suppose you’ve gone and refused Gilbert Blythe.  You are an idiot, Anne Shirley!” –Philippa (Phil) Gordon

Anne IslandWell, I’m squeaking in at the last minute with the review of this!  I absolutely loved Anne of the Island.  Hands down it’s my favorite of the series so far.  I could see myself reading this one again in years to come even if I don’t read any of the others.  There is something beguiling about Anne’s experience of college.  Maybe it reminds me of my own wonderful college years – the fun and friendship, the first taste of freedom, the sense that anything could happen on any given day.

The focus of the book returns to Anne herself, rather than Davy and Dora or her neighbors, as was the case in the last book.  We see Anne cementing friendships, fending off marriage proposals right and left, and studying hard.  We see her watch her friends, particularly the ones back home, pair off and begin to get married.  Anne is content to be by herself, and even Gilbert Blythe’s gentle but steady attention is too much for her.  She is afraid to lose the friendship that they have and she’s attached to her romantic ideal, which she thinks Gilbert doesn’t meet.   It’s frustrating watching Anne crush his heart and push him away.  I was so pleased when good old Phil called her an idiot!  I practically pumped my fist in the air in solidarity!  I do understand that she just wasn’t ready to make the commitment to Gilbert, and to the seriousness of those adult emotions.  Still, it was rather maddening when everyone around her could see how perfect they were for one another and she couldn’t.

Speaking of Phil, she’s a great addition to these books, isn’t she? I do hope she turns up in future installments.  Besides calling Anne an idiot, I loved it when she said, early on, “I’ve been feeling a little blue – just a pale, elusive azure.  It isn’t serious enough for anything darker.”  Her own love story arc is sweet as well.

There was that whole unpleasant episode with the cat who wouldn’t die, and the mention of Mr. Harrison’s dog who was hung twice, but I guess times were different when it came to animals, weren’t they?  They didn’t exactly have mobile spay and neuter trucks coming to the local park, or a vet to come to the house with an injection.  Still, that sort of jarred me a bit.

The pace of this book just zipped right along, especially in contrast to the previous book in the series, Anne of Avonlea.  Alternating between visits home and time at Redmond meant that we don’t get bogged down in one place for too long.  There was just enough Marilla, Mrs. Rachel, and Davy and Dora to ground Anne’s story, but not enough to become annoyed with.  I rather enjoyed meeting crotchety old Aunt Atossa!  She was a hoot!  Diana and Anne handled her rudeness perfectly, with a measure of amusement.  It was a most entertaining section, though.

I feel like my “review” of Anne of the Island is rather light, but I don’t have a lot to pick apart about this book!  It was a fast read; I thoroughly enjoyed it and eagerly returned to its pages when I had to put it down.  It made for perfect comfort reading.  I’ve heard from Melanie at Grab the Lapels that the odd numbered books are better than the even ones.  So far she’s right!  Despite that, I am excited to read next month’s book, Anne of Windy Poplars. Reminder:  anyone can join in on this readalong!  It’s going on for the remainder of the year, one book per month.

So, reader, have you read this series more than once?  Which is your favorite book?  Do you have any more suggestions for “comfort reading?”  I’m always looking to add to my list.

 

 

 

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Jane Steele by Lyndsay Faye

Sometimes it’s the books we love the most that are the hardest to write about, right?  I loved Lyndsay Faye’s Jane Steele, plain and simple.  It’s a novel that I want to buy so that I can read it again.  I can see it becoming a “comfort read” for me in the future.  It’s genuinely romantic, a page-turning mystery, and a surprisingly feminist spin on a classic, Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre.

I have only read Jane Eyre once  – I know, GASP! – back in high school.  It’s one of those books that I’ve been meaning to reread for ages.  But it’s influence is so widespread that the story feels fresh to me somehow.  I certainly don’t think you have to have read Jane Eyre recently or ever to enjoy Jane Steele, but for me it added an extra layer of enjoyment.

IMG_3493This is not what I would call a retelling, but rather I feel it is a companion piece to the original.  This Jane tells us from the first page,

I have been reading over and over again the most riveting book titled Jane Eyre, and the work inspires me to imitative acts.  My new printing features a daring introduction by the author railing against the first edition’s critics.  I relate to this story almost as I would a friend or a lover – at times I want to breathe it’s entire alphabet into my lungs, and at others I should prefer to throw it across the room.  Whoever heard of disembodied voices calling to governesses, of all people, as this Jane’s do?

Jane Steele is also an orphan, suffers at a horrible boarding school, and she becomes a governess, but there is one huge difference from the original – she’s a murderer.  This is not a spoiler, as it’s on the inside jacket flap and included in the first sentence.  I will say that she does not kill for fun.  Jane Steele is a warrior, fiercely protective of the people she cares for.  Perhaps this is what I loved most about the novel – her spirit of resourcefulness and capability, and her courage.  There is a decidedly feminist tone to the book, in Jane’s strength and also in her ownership of her sexuality.  Jane is a realistically lusty woman, and I appreciated that.

Which brings me to the romance at the heart of the novel.  I am not a dedicated romance reader, as a genre, but I DO appreciate a heartfelt, moving, deeply felt love story.  Lyndsay Faye has succeeded in bringing to life a sexy, slightly tortured, romantic pairing in Jane and Mr. Thornfield. I will not say more because I don’t want to spoil the plot.  But I loved, loved, loved, the pacing and unfolding of Jane’s attraction to her pupil’s father figure.

There’s also a riveting mystery about something precious hidden in a trunk, and a whole bunch of history about the British and Sikh wars in the Punjab, and all the while Jane is terrified of her past catching up with her.  I simultaneously couldn’t turn pages fast enough and didn’t want it to end.

I’m thrilled to have discovered that Lyndsay Faye has written previous novels and am adding them all to my TBR.  And I bought a used copy of Jane Eyre at the bookstore tonight.  I’m inspired now to reread the original after all this time.   This is going up there with Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney’s The Nest for my favorite books of the year so far.  It’s also my first read for the 10 Books of Summer challenge.  What a fun, well-written book to kick off my challenge!

 

 

Top Ten Tuesday: Five Excellent Romantic Books

This week’s Top Ten Tuesday, hosted by The Broke and The Bookish, was a Valentine’s Day freebie.  I’m not a reader of traditional romance. I’m not opposed to the genre; I just feel that I haven’t found the writer or series that will hook me in as of yet.  But there are a few novels that came to mind when I think of truly romantic stories.5826

  1. Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.  This dazzling novel is about SO much – racial constructs in America, the immigrant experience, contemporary Nigeria – but at its heart there’s a gripping love story, centered on young lovers Ifemelu and Obinze.  Will they find their way back to one another?  I was captivated.
  2. Bel Canto by Ann Patchett.   I think this is one of the most romantic books I’ve ever read.  Beautiful and heartbreaking.  It soars.
  3. Landline by Rainbow Rowell.  This was my first Rowell novel, and it resonated with me so much that I photocopied paragraphs and pasted them into my journal.  It’s a fun, quirky book, but it also contains some very real truths about marriage, especially marriage after kids.
  4. Every Day by David Levithan.  A YA book that totally sucked me in and had me crying.  A is a genderless being who wakes up in  a different body everyday.  A has learned to cope with this strange, rootless existence, until one day A falls in love with Rhiannon.  There’s a sequel recently out called Another Day.  I can’t wait to read it after the TBR Triple Dog Dare is over. 51i318LHixL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_
  5. Prodigal Summer by Barbara Kingsolver.  There are many thread to this novel about humans and the nature they interact with in the Southern Appalachians, but I chose it for this list because parts of it are really very lusty – in a good way.  I’ve read it twice and I’d read it again in a heartbeat.

I could have chosen Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice – because isn’t this really the ultimate love story?  But I thought it was too obvious.  I also could have picked Audrey Niffenegger’s The Time Traveler’s Wife.  But I haven’t read it since 2003, and I don’t trust my judgment on that one.  I’d just come out of a devastating breakup.  I just remember sobbing my eyes out.  I’m happy with the five books I’ve chosen – they’re all very different but they all speak to the universal truth of humans seeking connection.  I’d love to hear your picks for romantic books – suggestions, please!